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.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. issue exists to teach humanity, but there's always more than one side to an issue. more than one face to any reality. teaches you beware of appearances. the best laid plans of mice and men, etc., issue is the embodiment of the lesson gained by such things. and when you teach humanity about the folly in -- [inaudible] or being dogmatic about any issue, it tends to do it in a rather painful way, you know, hike a good teacher armed with a cane, symbolic cane for adults who haven't learned the wisdom of looking at both sides of a question. and his places are the crossroads where, of course, which is the place where human beings get confused. which road do you take at a crossroads? issue's so mischievous that in the overall pant
does not mean you believe -- e.b. religious on sunday are private. we have privatized religion to such a great extent. in some of us may be obsessed about this issue, but we talked about freedom and religious freedom and a conscience. my sense is most of america has no idea what we are talking about. we have different senses of what he freedom is. maybe it means increased access to contraception. how do we get a common vocabulary again? >> on the freedom of conscience and religious freedom -- religious liberty peas, i think the left feared that percolating which is what they turned it into an argument. i have to make it more here in now, one that affects more of my base voters. i think if we learn to start each sentence with a question which is, is it fair that the government -- fill in the blank with almost anything you want. take your money and taxes, tell you cannot worship your god. you cannot send your kids to a better school. is it fear the government tells you that you cannot run that business? is it fair that the government -- what they do without saying it -- i really
is somewhat distressing, we are moving in our country to maybe a state religion which says anybody who believes homosexuality is biblically untrue is some kind of a pariah, and so we're forcing a religious belief on the catholics and on the muslims and all these religious groups who happen to believe that homosexuality's inappropriate. whatever each of you believe, you should be able to believe what you want to believe. but i don't think the government should force or a religion onto a nation of people where we've so held, clinged to our idea of religious freedom. someone has told me, and this is a high-level person who all of you know, he heads up one of the think tanks, that george soros has funded an organization which is now going into churches to tape sermons for the fact that going forward -- i believe it's section 501 and not necessarily 501(c)(3), but the bob jones university lost its tax exemption because they had a policy against interracial marriage. and that was against public policy. so what this section in the irs says, 501, if you are against public policy, your tax exem
going on where people who had taken on certain religions were not voting. i saw the felonies that people wanted to change in the community. as far as supporting him in those areas of his new agenda, you have to understand that he had four years to clean up america and he has done a wonderful job. he pulled together a campaign and put diversity all over. we have to stop looking at presidential issues and look at what is at hand. we need to stop hiding behind a wall and congress should helpless do that, not fair to the people, the children that were killed. who is going to work? who is going to take on the new america if there are no people to take it on? thank you for allowing me to have my opinion. i truly feel that american citizens that lived and died for us, thank you to them for allowing us to have this conversation. >> the eugene robinson -- host: the eugene robinson piece this morning, "no longer the black president." "the verdict of his presidency will depend on what he accomplishes in his second term." host: that is the piece from eugene robinson, "no longer the black president."
. it is an exploitation and hijacking of an old and honored religion. we need to find a way -- this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to which that is happening and becoming an excuse for their disenfranchisement. for being deprived of good governance, good economy, jobs, opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. carrying the banner of religious tolerance, diversity is critical. we have raised that with resident morsi -- president .orsi we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. we need to work together to try to do it. you raised a central issue with respect to what is happenioticss in the world. it has to be front and center in our dialogue. >> thank you. mr. chairman, all of us who have known you thought that you had for president yourself well. you will be confirmed in the next few days. i thank you for your -- for the fact that you want to serve in this position and that you have developed in extensive a
is not israel. it's really radical slafm. it isn't exploitation and hijacking of an old honored religion. what we need to do is find a way, and this is something we have to work at, for people to understand the degree to which it's happening. and becoming in some places an excuse for their disfranchisement. for being deprived good government and economy and job and opportunity. one of our missions is not not let it be an excuse. so i think that carrying the banner of religious tolerance is critical. i know, we have raised that with president morsi. i have personally raised that with him. i think was the first american to meet with president morsi even before he knew he was a candidate. we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. now that hasn't happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process, but as i said, that's an ongoing process. we need to work together in order try to do it. senator, you raised a central, central issue with respect what is happening to the politics of certain regions of the world, and it's gotten t
constrained because of religion to talk to my male counterparts, and were more open to talking to me because i was a women. when one of the. goals is to win the hearts and minds, being able to communicate with the local population is critical and i have seen reports of engagement with local children and women in a way that must be much more difficult for men to do, and of course as medics serving fellow soldiers. host: the last caller run-up israeli women who served in combat in the israeli army. we want to show our viewers a list of countries allowing women in close combat roles including -- for the sake of this discussion, defying what is combat -- define what is combat. guest: the regulation was written in 1994, and according to that women were to be banned from ground combat, which was defined as engaging the enemy on the ground while being exposed to hostile fire and a high probability of direct physical conflict. it would take place on the battlefield. interestingly enough, as engagid regulation that was just rescinded -- the army regulation was different and banned women from code locat
where they can look at the blessing. >> i think that what's helping this family is their religion, their community. they're embedded in a community, and many people in this country are not. you know, there's been a tremendous loss of community and connections with people. so, you know, i would just say, you know, build up your community and your connections, because this kind of thing can happen to any one of us at any moment. >> salgo: i want to go back very quickly to this whole concept of complicated grief, or whatever you'd like to call it. there's this -- there's a list. extreme depression, focus on the loss, intense longing -- that just goes on, and you get stuck, i thinkwas the phrase that you used. if someone has these symptoms, what do you do about it? is there medical intervention that works? >> well, i think, first of all, all those symptoms are probably normal for a while. and what i really look at is, are they interfering with the person's functioning. otherwise, a lot of those things are normal and can continue for a long time. >> but i think when they're interfering
of an old and honored religion. and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to what that is happening and how it has become an excuse for their disenfranchisement, for being deprived of good governance, for being deprived of a good economy, jobs and opportunity. one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think carrying the banner of religious tolerance and diversity and pluralism is critical. i know we have raised that with president morsi. i've personally raised that with him. i think i was the first american to meet with him before he became -- before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brother had to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. that has not happened completely as much as we would like in the constitutional process. but, as i said, that is an ongoing process and we need to work together in order to try to do it. but, senator, you've raised a central issue with respect to what is happening to politics of certain regions of the world. and it has t
and hijacking of an old and honored religion and what we need to do is find a way -- and this is something we have to work at -- for people to understand the degree to which that is happening and becoming in some places an excuse for their disenfranchisement, of being deprived of good can governance, jobs, opportunity and one of our missions is to not let that be an excuse. so i think that carrying the banner of religious tolerance, of diversity and pluralism is critical. we have raised that with president morsi. i think i was the first american to meet with the president before he even knew he was a candidate. and we talked about the need for the brotherhood to be able to respect the diversity of egypt. now that hasn't happened completely as we would like in the constitutional process. but as i said, that's an ongoing process and we need to work together to try to do it. but senator, you raise a central, central issue with respect to what is happening to the politics of certain regions of the world. and it's got to be front and center in our dialogue. >> thank you. >> senator corker, final c
, and then it talks about egyptian. it doesn't talk about their sex or religion or sex. it continues talking about egyptians as persons. so that's the whole thing. >> when you wanted to say something? >> [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i believe that the west must be aware of something. now, after the revolution the west wanted to deal with arab regimes that were similar to his own regime, similar to his own situation. they thought that the situation would be similar to what they had in the west. however, the people in the arab world don't want that. they want respect for their own specificities, they have their own conditions and their own contexts. what do we want as arab people? we don't want women to ware the veil -- wear the veil to remove the veil, we don't want to force them to wear the veil. we don't want to force anybody to do anything. now, of course, we are witnessing this movement and this transformation in our society, and we have some people who might force their wives or their daughters to wear the veil or to remove the veil. however, this is not the opinion of the mainst
with different representations from different religions and all valued together. so against that contract they are suspicious of, unhappy with the edgy hottest sentiment behind other groups. at the same time when you are fighting for your life, when your family members are being massacred and tortured, when your children are being torn apart and bomb explosions, the people who are fighting beside you require legitimacy. and it is important that we be involved enough to not only offset but overwhelmed that legitimacy that the extremist groups are obtaining. if we think back to our own history, 225 years ago we were country with an internal war for independence to drive
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)